About Centennial Animal Hospital

Owl

We are a full service, small animal hospital located in Fort Richmond, 2 minutes inside the South Perimeter, in Winnipeg, Manitoba. We have been serving South Winnipeg and the surrounding areas since 1970. Centennial Animal Hospital offers advanced veterinary care as well as medical, surgical and dental services. We provide the latest in technology from laser surgery to digital radiology. In 1986 we added professional grooming and pet boarding to our list of services. In 2003 we expanded our facilites and started offering doggie daycare and obedience training.

Full list of services

September News

September is Senior Month

IN HONOR OF OUR FURRY SENIORS, PLEASE ENJOY 10% OFF ALL OF OUR SENIOR PRODUCTS FOR THE ENTIRE MONTH!

WHEN IS YOUR PET CONSIDERED TO BE A SENIOR?

In general, dogs older than seven years of age and domestic cats older than nine are considered senior pets. Senior pets are in the stage of life in which the aging process is beginning to affect every organ system. Some organs "wear out" faster or are more susceptible to cumulative damage than others, so certain observations are especially important to make. The following is a list of key recommendations that we feel are important for older pets:

  • Keep vaccinations current. As with other body systems, the immune system also begins to weaken.
  • Have blood and urine tests evaluated at least once a year. Early detection of chronic diseases such as kidney disease, thyroid disease and diabetes is the key to successful treatment and preservation of quality of life.
  • Keep plenty of fresh water available and monitor its consumption.
  • Weigh on the same scale and record results at least every two months. Changes in weight can be an early indicator of disease.
  • Keep annual exams up to date.

    senior_dogs_recommendations_2_2009

    THE MAJOR HEALTH PROBLEMS SEEN IN OLDER CATS ARE:

    • Obesity
    • Periodontal disease
    • Hormonal disorders such as hyperthyroidism and diabetes mellitus
    • Kidney disease
    • Liver disease
    • Heart disease
    • Neoplasia or cancer
    • Infections such as feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)
    • Osteoarthritis

    You should remember that, while young cats usually have only one disorder at a time, this is often not the case in older patients, where diagnosis and treatment may be complicated by several concurrent disease processes.

    senior_dogs_recommendations_2_2009

    ALERT YOUR VETERINARIAN IF YOU NOTICE ANY OF THE FOLLOWING CHANGES TO YOUR SENIOR DOG:

    • Sustained significant increase in water consumption. (normal water intake should be less than 100 ml/kg/day or approximately 1 ½ cups (12 ounces)/day for a 10 pound dog).
    • Sustained significant increase in urination.
    • Weight loss.
    • Significant decrease in appetite or failure to eat for more than two consecutive days.
    • Significant increase in appetite.
    • Repeated vomiting, or diarrhea that lasts over three days.
    • Difficulty in passing stool or urine, or sudden loss of housetraining.
    • Lameness that lasts more than three days, or lameness in more than one leg.
    • Noticeable decrease in vision, especially if sudden in onset or pupils that do not constrict in bright light.
    • Masses, ulcerations (open sores), or multiple scabs on the skin that persist more than one week.
    • Foul mouth odor or drooling that lasts over two days, or inability to chew dry food.
    • Persistent coughing or gagging, or excessive panting.
    • Sudden collapse or bouts of weakness.
    • A seizure (convulsion or "fit")

    OLD AGE IS NOT A DISEASE!

    The aim of any senior care program is to maintain the quality of the patient's life and to slow the progression of age-related disease. Because most of the chronic diseases we see in senior cats are slow to progress, early recognition is usually only possible through diagnostic tests. The earlier we can diagnose a disease, the more the likelihood that we can slow or reverse its progression and maintain a longer period of high quality of life for your senior pet. Senior pets should have regular health checks (every six to twelve months).

    Senior care programs usually include a thorough physical examination, blood and urine screening and chest or abdominal radiographs. Body weight should be recorded regularly and booster vaccinations should be given as determined by your pet's lifestyle. We will provide you with additional details about our senior care programs upon request.

    While it is true that "old age is not a disease", older patients do merit special attention. This is important so that if your pet develops disease, we can recognize and treat it as early as possible, thereby maintaining its quality of life for as long as possible.

  • Photo Gallery

    Client Survey

    Your opinion is important to us and the information you provide will help us to improve our services and help us maintain a high level of patient care and client satisfaction.

    Contact Us

    Address: 2747 Pembina Hwy, Winnipeg, MB
    Telephone 1: 204.269.8162 (Hospital)
    Telephone 2: 204.261.5928 (Boarding,
    Grooming & Daycare) E-mail: info@centennialanimalhospital.com