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Cat X-ray and Ultrasound

Radiography is painless, very safe, and non-invasive, and it can sometimes be performed during an outpatient visit while you wait. Radiography is useful for evaluating the bones and the size, shape, and position of internal organs.

An ultrasound scan is a medical test that uses high-frequency sound waves to capture live images from the inside of your body. It’s also known as sonography. An ultrasound allows your veterinarian to see problems with your cat’s organs, vessels, and tissues without needing to make an incision. Unlike other imaging techniques, ultrasound uses no radiation.

What is the technology?


While the general process of taking the x-ray remains unchanged, the developing process has greatly improved giving us better quality images through digital development versus film. The process is also quicker allowing your veterinarian to get results faster. There are also more digital tools to assess images.

Does the clinic also do feline dental x-rays?


We are proud to offer digital dental x-rays. Dental radiography involves obtaining X-ray images of the mouth, teeth, and jaws. Radiography is painless, safe, and completely non-invasive. Dental radiographs are obtained during a routine dental examination and cleaning. However, in cases of facial trauma or head trauma, dental radiographs may be taken to assess the extent of damage to the mouth, teeth, and jaws. Anesthesia is necessary in this case so that your cat can be properly positioned.

Dental radiographs can help our veterinarians evaluate the health of tooth roots and identify a variety of problems that are not visible just by looking at your cat’s teeth, including:

  • Tumors involving the bones of the jaw
  • Tooth impactions (teeth that are wedged in or cannot erupt normally)
  • Tooth fractures
  • Tooth root abscesses
  • Retained teeth (teeth that failed to shed at the proper time)
  • Feline Resorptive lesions (painful erosions of the tooth)

How much does cat x-ray cost?


Please call our hospital at 204-269-8162 to discuss pricing.

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Water Intoxication

Water Intoxication in Dogs

Does your dog like to play in the water? Too much of a good thing can be dangerous, so look out for water intoxication!Water intoxication, also known as hyponatremia is a relatively rare but potentially fatal condition that is most commonly seen in dogs that love to play in the water. Water games that involve retrieving items or diving into pools to catch toys can cause them to ingest large quantities of water very quickly. It can also happen when they “catch” pressurized water from sprinklers or hoses.Excessive amounts of water cause the body to lose sodium. The body's cells begin to fill with water and swell. If the cells in the brain swell, it can affect the central nervous system which can be fatal.Symptoms include:loss of coordination lethargy bloating vomiting glazed eyes excessive salivation difficulty breathing seizures comaWater intoxication progresses quickly so if your pet has been playing in the water and begins to show any of the signs mentioned above, it's crucial to seek veterinary care immediately to save your dog's life.Treatment of water intoxication typically includes IV delivery of electrolytes, diuretics and drugs to reduce brain swelling. With aggressive veterinary care, some dogs are able to recover, but sadly, many do not.It's important to closely watch dogs that are very active in water and ensure they take regular breaks in between playing. Be especially careful on days when the water is rough. If your dog empties their water bowl after playing hard or exercise, ensure they are rested before refilling the bowl.Familiarize yourself with the symptoms of water intoxication to keep your furry family member safe!If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at 204-269-8162 or by email at info@centennialanimalhospital.com.Written by Centennial Animal Hospital

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