Our team continues to be here for you and your cherished pets. We are OPEN and are now able to provide a wide range of services. To learn more about the changes we have implemented in response to COVID-19 and what to expect during your next visit, click here.

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Senior Dog Care

As your dog ages, many of his/her basic needs, from diet to exercise, will begin to change. Dogs are very good at hiding their health problems and as an owner, it’s your responsibility to keep an eye on your senior dog to ensure that you are adjusting his routine to match changes in his body and immune system that make him less able to cope with physical and environmental stresses. Routine exams, preventive medicine, and adjustments to your dog’s lifestyle can help your loyal friend stay healthy even as the years creep up.

When does a dog become a senior?


Key factors such as size determine how dogs age at varying rates. For example, small breed dogs reach senior status at approximately nine years of age, medium breed dog at eight years and larger breed dogs at 6-7 years.
While each dog reaches “seniorhood” at a different age, most canines become seniors between 7 and 10 years old. It’s important to know your dog’s age, so you know when he/she becomes a senior.

What are common senior dog health issues?


Some issues that become more prevalent as your dog ages can include the following:

  1. Arthritis
  2. Cancer (especially testicular or breast cancer)
  3. Prostate disease
  4. Cognitive disorders
  5. Intestinal problems
  6. Deafness
  7. Dental disease
  8. Diabetes mellitus
  9. Kidney disease
  10. Liver disease
  11. Vision problems

How should I care for my senior dog? (Schedule regular check-up, exercise, etc.)


Just like us, regular health checkups become increasingly important as dogs grow older. We recommend that your senior dog should be seen at least once every six months. The purpose of these wellness exams is to do three things:

  • Promote your dog’s health and longevity.
  • Recognize and control your dog’s health risks.
  • Detect any illnesses at their earliest stages, which may improve treatment options.

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How to help injured and orphaned wild animals

Below are a few suggestions should you come across injured or orphaned wildlife.  First, you need to determine if the wild animal is indeed injured or abandoned without putting yourself in harm’s way. Try not to have too much contact with the animal or to disturb the surroundings. If you are unsure, it is best that you leave it be and call a wildlife specialist to notify them about the animal and its location. Certain animals like rabbits and deer often leave their young alone for long periods throughout the day. If it appears healthy and well, do not disturb the animal. 

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Last updated: September 09, 2020

Dear Clients,

With recent changes to restrictions on businesses, we are pleased to advise that effective May 11, 2020 the restrictions on veterinary practices have been lifted. Based on these changes, below are some important updates to our operating policies.

1. WE CONTINUE TO SEE ALL CASES BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

This includes vaccines, wellness exams, blood work, heartworm testing, spays and neuters, dental services, and more!

Note: Priority will be given to urgent or sick pets, as well as time-sensitive puppy/kitten vaccinations.

2. SAFETY MEASURES TO KEEP EVERYONE SAFE

3. ONLINE CONSULTATIONS ARE AVAILABLE

If you wish to connect with a veterinarian via message, phone or video, visit our website and follow the "Online Consultation" link.

4. OPERATING HOURS

We are OPEN with the following hours:

Monday - Thursday: 7:30 am - 8:00 pm
Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sunday: CLOSED

5. PET BOARDING & GROOMING

Thank you for your patience and understanding and we look forward to seeing you and your furry family members again!

- Your dedicated team at Centennial Animal Hospital