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Dog Spaying and Neutering

Spaying and neutering are surgical procedures to remove reproductive organs. Spaying or neutering your puppy or dog prevents him or her from having unwanted offspring. It also decreases the number of puppies/dogs that end up in shelters or are summoned to a life on the streets. It also has very important health and behaviour benefits for your dog. Our hospital offers laser surgery as an option to reduce pain and bleeding. All of our patients receive perioperative pain management and additional take home medication can be dispensed as required.

Why is it important to neuter/spay my dog?

Your faithful companion will live a longer, healthier life and you will experience fewer headaches if you get him or her spayed or neutered.

Spaying and neutering reduces or eliminates:

  1. The odds of breast cancer and dangerous uterine infections in females and prostate problems and testicular cancer in males.
  2. Frustration in resisting the natural urge to mate. Your companion will be less distracted, more easily trained, and a more contented member of your family.
  3. The animal’s need to roam in search of a mate, decreasing the chances that your pet will become lost, get into fights with other animals or be hit by a car.
  4. Messy heat cycles in females and attracting unwanted males.
  5. The tendency to bite. However, your pet will still be protective of his home and family even after being altered. Aggression is different from protectiveness.
  6. Marking territory or making inappropriate sexual approaches toward people or objects.
  7. The extra expense for food or veterinary care in the event of an unexpected litter of puppies.

How old should a dog be before neutering/spaying?

These procedures are generally recommended for puppies before they reach sexual maturity at about 5-6 months old. This gives your puppy time to grow and mature enough to safely undergo general anesthesia. After 6 months of age, spaying and neutering can be done at any age. Smaller breed dogs are more likely to have retained baby teeth that may need to be extracted. This can be done during the same anesthetic as the spay or neuter. Some research indicates that some larger breed dogs may benefit by waiting until rapid bone growth has ceased. You can discuss the best timing of the surgery for your pet with our veterinarians.

How much does it cost to neuter/spay a dog?

Please call our hospital at 204-269-8162 to speak to one of our team members and discuss pricing.

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Water Intoxication

Water Intoxication in Dogs

Does your dog like to play in the water? Too much of a good thing can be dangerous, so look out for water intoxication!Water intoxication, also known as hyponatremia is a relatively rare but potentially fatal condition that is most commonly seen in dogs that love to play in the water. Water games that involve retrieving items or diving into pools to catch toys can cause them to ingest large quantities of water very quickly. It can also happen when they “catch” pressurized water from sprinklers or hoses.Excessive amounts of water cause the body to lose sodium. The body's cells begin to fill with water and swell. If the cells in the brain swell, it can affect the central nervous system which can be fatal.Symptoms include:loss of coordination lethargy bloating vomiting glazed eyes excessive salivation difficulty breathing seizures comaWater intoxication progresses quickly so if your pet has been playing in the water and begins to show any of the signs mentioned above, it's crucial to seek veterinary care immediately to save your dog's life.Treatment of water intoxication typically includes IV delivery of electrolytes, diuretics and drugs to reduce brain swelling. With aggressive veterinary care, some dogs are able to recover, but sadly, many do not.It's important to closely watch dogs that are very active in water and ensure they take regular breaks in between playing. Be especially careful on days when the water is rough. If your dog empties their water bowl after playing hard or exercise, ensure they are rested before refilling the bowl.Familiarize yourself with the symptoms of water intoxication to keep your furry family member safe!If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at 204-269-8162 or by email at info@centennialanimalhospital.com.Written by Centennial Animal Hospital

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