We remain open to provide care for your pets. We are following the direction of government and regulatory authorities and have implemented hospital and visit protocols to keep both you and our team safe. For regular updates on our hours and visit protocols, please follow our social media platforms.

Why Do We Need Anesthesia for Dental Cleanings?

There is always a risk with anesthesia, no matter how healthy the pet or minor the procedure is. At Centennial Animal Hospital we are fully staffed with individuals highly skilled and trained to provide safe anesthesia with minimal to no complications. So why must animals get anesthesia for a dental cleaning? Why can’t a veterinarian reach into the mouth and scrape the teeth much like the dentist does to us? Some owners will even vouch for their pet saying “they are very well behaved!” Well unlike us, your pet does not understand the concept of a dental cleaning, or why someone may be putting a sharp pointy tool into their mouth and below the gum line and can easily be injured if they suddenly move their head or try to get away.

Not only that but if we attempt to do anesthesia-free dental, it would be purely cosmetic. We would not be able to perform the level of cleaning required to remove the plaque and tartar that is below the gum line and between the teeth effectively. We would only be able to scrape off the visibly stained tartar that can be easily seen.

Some animals have very long snouts, and if the animal was not under anesthesia we would not be able to reach all the way to the back of the mouth, on all sides of the teeth, as we cannot ask the dog to say “ahh”. If the animal has a very small crowded mouth like a pug, we would not be able to get in-between all the tightly packed teeth at the right angle, if the dog was awake.

So the main reasons behind using anesthesia for dental cleanings;

  • It allows us to clean all aspects of the teeth, above and below the gum line, and all the tightly packed areas between other teeth and against the cheeks and tongue.
  • This allows your veterinarian and technician to get a full assessment of the mouth without the dog moving. It allows us to check for any pocketing in the gums, mobile teeth, any pieces of tartar hidden deep in the back of the mouth, as well as checking for any ulcers or growths that may be hiding in the mouth.
  • The pets and staff stay safe! The animal doesn’t get hurt by moving with sharp instruments in the mouth, and the staff don’t get bit if the animal experiences some discomfort.
  • It allows us to take dental x-rays to see what is going on below the gum line. A tooth may look fine from the outside, but sometimes an abscess has started to form deep by the tooth root, or there could be bone loss or other abnormalities not seen by the naked eye. Without anesthesia, the x-ray dental sensor would not be able to be accurately and safely placed.
  • If an extraction needs to take place, then we definitely want the animal under anesthesia for that. We will give a proper dental nerve block, but often the tooth still needs to be properly elevated or sectioned. Sometimes the gum needs to be surgically cut to make a flap, so we are able to get down to the root to properly elevate it from the alveolar bone. None of which you want your pet to be awake and conscious for.

Written by: Michelle, RVT

Category:

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How to help injured and orphaned wild animals

Below are a few suggestions should you come across injured or orphaned wildlife.  First, you need to determine if the wild animal is indeed injured or abandoned without putting yourself in harm’s way. Try not to have too much contact with the animal or to disturb the surroundings. If you are unsure, it is best that you leave it be and call a wildlife specialist to notify them about the animal and its location. Certain animals like rabbits and deer often leave their young alone for long periods throughout the day. If it appears healthy and well, do not disturb the animal. 

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Last updated: May 11, 2020

Dear Clients,

With recent changes to restrictions on businesses, we are pleased to advise that effective May 11, 2020 the restrictions on veterinary practices have been lifted. Based on these changes, below are some important updates to our operating policies.

1. WE CONTINUE TO SEE ALL CASES BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

This includes vaccines, wellness exams, blood work, heartworm testing, spays and neuters, dental services, and more!

Note: Priority will be given to urgent or sick pets, as well as time-sensitive puppy/kitten vaccinations.

2. SAFETY MEASURES TO KEEP EVERYONE SAFE

3. ONLINE CONSULTATIONS ARE AVAILABLE

If you wish to connect with a veterinarian via message, phone or video, visit our website and follow the "Online Consultation" link.

4. OPERATING HOURS

We are OPEN with the following hours:

- Monday: 8:00 am - 7:00 pm
- Tuesday to Thursday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
- Friday: 8:00 am - 6:00 pm
- Saturday: 8:00 am - 4:00 pm
- Sunday: CLOSED

5. PET BOARDING & GROOMING

Thank you for your patience and understanding and we look forward to seeing you and your furry family members again!

- Your dedicated team at Centennial Animal Hospital