Our team continues to be here for you and your cherished pets. We are OPEN and are now able to provide a wide range of services. To learn more about the changes we have implemented in response to COVID-19 and what to expect during your next visit, click here.

204.269.8162

Water Intoxication in Dogs

Does your dog like to play in the water? Too much of a good thing can be dangerous, so look out for water intoxication!

Water intoxication, also known as hyponatremia is a relatively rare but potentially fatal condition that is most commonly seen in dogs that love to play in the water. Water games that involve retrieving items or diving into pools to catch toys can cause them to ingest large quantities of water very quickly. It can also happen when they “catch” pressurized water from sprinklers or hoses.

Excessive amounts of water cause the body to lose sodium. The body’s cells begin to fill with water and swell. If the cells in the brain swell, it can affect the central nervous system which can be fatal.

Symptoms include:

  • loss of coordination
  • lethargy
  • bloating
  • vomiting
  • glazed eyes
  • excessive salivation
  • difficulty breathing
  • seizures
  • coma

Water intoxication progresses quickly so if your pet has been playing in the water and begins to show any of the signs mentioned above, it’s crucial to seek veterinary care immediately to save your dog’s life.

Treatment of water intoxication typically includes IV delivery of electrolytes, diuretics and drugs to reduce brain swelling. With aggressive veterinary care, some dogs are able to recover, but sadly, many do not.

It’s important to closely watch dogs that are very active in water and ensure they take regular breaks in between playing. Be especially careful on days when the water is rough. If your dog empties their water bowl after playing hard or exercise, ensure they are rested before refilling the bowl.

Familiarize yourself with the symptoms of water intoxication to keep your furry family member safe!

If you have any questions or concerns, please contact us at 204-269-8162 or by email at info@centennialanimalhospital.com.

Written by Centennial Animal Hospital

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How to help injured and orphaned wild animals

Below are a few suggestions should you come across injured or orphaned wildlife.  First, you need to determine if the wild animal is indeed injured or abandoned without putting yourself in harm’s way. Try not to have too much contact with the animal or to disturb the surroundings. If you are unsure, it is best that you leave it be and call a wildlife specialist to notify them about the animal and its location. Certain animals like rabbits and deer often leave their young alone for long periods throughout the day. If it appears healthy and well, do not disturb the animal. 

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Last updated: October 14, 2020

Dear Clients,

Due to the current rapid increase in positive Covid-19 cases, we will be reverting to our "closed waiting room" policy effective October 15.  Clients will no longer be allowed inside our hospital.

1. WE CONTINUE TO SEE ALL CASES BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

This includes vaccines, wellness exams, blood work, heartworm testing, spays and neuters, dental services, and more!

Note: Priority will be given to urgent or sick pets, as well as time-sensitive puppy/kitten vaccinations. If you're unsure whether your pet needs medical attention, please call us to discuss your situation. 

2. SAFETY MEASURES TO KEEP EVERYONE SAFE

3. OPERATING HOURS

We are OPEN with the following hours:

Monday - Thursday: 7:30 am - 8:00 pm
Friday: 7:30 am - 7:00 pm
Saturday: 8:00 am - 5:00 pm
Sunday: CLOSED

4. PET BOARDING & GROOMING

Thank you for helping us be diligent for everyone's safety. With your cooperation, our team can continue to provide outstanding care to our cherished patients, without compromising the safety of our staff and clients. Any updates will be provided as changes occur.

- Your dedicated team at Centennial Animal Hospital